Sci-Arc
Inside SCI-Arc

SCI-ARC LECTURE


02.25.09 | Keck Lecture Hall, 7pm
Michael Bell: Engineered Transparency



Michael Bell Architecture was established in 1989 and is based in New York City. Bell is an associate professor at Columbia University, and Director of the Core Design Studios as well as Coordinator of the school's Housing Studios. Bell is also Director of the Columbia Project on Housing and teaches a planning course on the development, design and financing of public and affordable housing.

Michael Bell Architecture specializes in housing and urban redevelopment where housing is a key component. In 2001 Bell lead a team of architects who provided research, planning and design for 1800 units of housing on a 100-acre parcel of oceanfront land owned by the New York Department of Housing Preservation and Development. The project was commissioned by the Architectural League of New York and the NYHPD as a research proposal. Bell also founded "16 Houses," a housing research and design program in Houston, for the Fifth Ward Redevelopment Corporation. Projects by Bell have received four Progressive Architecture Design Awards and Citations, and have been exhibited at the Museum of Modern Art, The Yale School of Architecture, The Architectural League of New York, The University Art Museum, Berkeley and at Archi-Lab. Work is also included in the permanent collection of the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art. Bell is the author of 16 Houses: Designing the Public's Private House and Space Replaces Us (Monacelli Press, 2003). He is also the editor of Slow Space with Sze Tsung Leong.

Bell is the chair of two major conferences at Columbia: Engineered Transparency: Glass in Architecture and Structural Engineering, and Solid States: Changing Time in Concrete. Bell is the editor of books covering both events to be published by Princeton Architectural Press. Engineered Transparency is due in September 2008.

Michael Bell has taught at the University of California at Berkeley, Rice University, and the Harvard University Graduate School of Design. http://www.visibleweather.com